GMAT Practice Questions Verb Tense

An important building block of Sentence Correction is Verb tense. We are all aware of the simple classifications in verb tense. For convenience sakes, let’s look at various tense forms of the verb “to go” (an irregular verb), with both singular and plural forms.

The basic classification with tense is future, past and present. As the names suggest and as we all know, past is over, future is yet to happen. And the present is what is happening.

Simple past tense: she went, they went

Simple present tense: he goes, they go

Simple future tense: she will go, they will go

Past perfect tense: he had gone, they had gone

Present perfect tense: she has gone, they have gone

Future perfect tense: he will have gone, they will have gone

Past progressive tense: she was going, they were going

Present progressive tense: he is going, they are going

Future progressive tense: she will be going, they will be going

Past perfect progressive tense: he had been going, they had been going

Present perfect progressive tense: she has been going, they have been going

Future perfect progressive tense: he will have been going, they will have been going

Now, let’s look at an example.

Since the online magazine’s popularity ranking dropped last year, the editors have been determined to update the online content daily, and they are.

  1. have been determined to update the online content daily, and they are
  2. are determined to update the online content daily, and have been
  3. were determined to update the online content daily, and they were
  4. have been determined to update the online content daily, and they do
  5. had been determined to update the online content daily, and they have

‘Dropped’ is in simple past. It’s over! We mean to say that the stakeholders are trying (they are still trying) to keep the content updated. It is an on-going process. So, we are looking at present continuous form of the verb tense when it comes to what the editors are doing. They are determined. And they are updating content regularly. The only option that has both verbs in the right tense is option is D.  When you say that they have been determined, it means that their determination is still continuous. And the simple present verb ‘do’ means that it’s happening right now. so, D makes the cut.

More on GMAT Verbal:
GMAT CR Alternate Cause
GMAT CR Reverse Causation
GMAT CR: No Coincidence

BYJU’S will be glad to help you in your GMAT preparation journey. You can ask for any assistance related to GMAT and MBA from us by just giving a missed call at +918884544444, or you can drop an SMS. You can write to us at gmat@byjus.com.