United Nations World Tourism Organization (unwto/omt)

The World Tourism Organization (UNWTO/OMT), a specialized agency of the United Nations, is the leading international organization in the field of tourism. It serves as a global forum for tourism policy issues and practical source of tourism know-how.

With its headquarters in Madrid, Spain, the UNWTO plays a central and decisive role in promoting the development of responsible, sustainable and universally accessible tourism, with the aim of contributing to economic development, international understanding, peace, prosperity and universal respect for, and observance of, human rights and fundamental freedoms. In pursuing this aim, the Organization pays particular attention to the interests of developing countries in the field of tourism.

The UNWTO plays a catalytic role in promoting technology transfers and international cooperation, in stimulating and developing public-private sector partnerships and in encouraging the implementation of the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism, with a view to ensuring that member countries, tourist destinations and businesses maximize the positive economic, social and cultural effects of tourism and fully reap its benefits, while minimizing its negative social and environmental impacts.

CATEGORY V – ADVISORY SUBSIDIARY BODY OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY
Under this category the following organizations are described.

1. United Nations Peace Building Commission

UNITED NATIONS PEACE BUILDING COMMISSION – THE PEACE BUILDING COMMISSION (PBC)
The Peace building Commission (PBC) is an intergovernmental advisory body that supports peace efforts in countries emerging from conflict, and is a key addition to the capacity of the International Community in the broad peace agenda.
The Peace building Commission plays a unique role in (1) bringing together all of the relevant actors, including international donors, the international financial institutions, national governments, troop contributing countries;

(2) marshalling resources and (3) advising on and proposing integrated strategies for post-conflict peace building and recovery and where appropriate, highlighting any gaps that threaten to undermine peace.

MANDATE OF THE PEACEBUILDING COMMISSION

In the enabling resolutions establishing the Peace building Commission, resolution 60/180 and resolution 1645 (2005) of 20 December 2005, the United Nations General Assembly and the Security Council mandated it:
– to bring together all relevant actors to marshal resources and to advise on and propose integrated strategies for post-conflict peace building and recovery;
– to focus attention on the reconstruction and institution-building efforts necessary for recovery from conflict and to support the development of integrated strategies in order to lay the foundation for sustainable development;
– to provide recommendations and information to improve the coordination of all relevant actors within and outside the United Nations, to develop best practices, to help to ensure predictable financing for early recovery activities and to extend the period of attention given by the international community to post conflict recovery.
CATEGORY VI- SUBSIDIARIES BODY OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY
Under this category the following organizations are described.
1. DC – Disarmament Commission
2. ILC – International Law Commission

1. THE UNITED NATIONS DISARMAMENT COMMISSION (UNDC)
The United Nations Disarmament Commission (UNDC) is a deliberative body and a subsidiary organ of the UN General Assembly which is mandated to consider and make recommendations on various disarmament related issues and to follow up the relevant decisions and recommendations of the special sessions devoted to disarmament held so far.

The Disarmament Commission was re-established at the first Special Session of the General Assembly devoted to Disarmament in 1978 to succeed an earlier Disarmament Commission, which ceased to convene after 1965. It consists of all Member States and holds its substantive yearly sessions in New York (usually in late spring) for approximately three weeks. The Commission reports annually to the General Assembly. Since 1978, the Disarmament Commission has dealt with numerous disarmament related questions, both nuclear and conventional, and has submitted guidelines and principles on various subject items, including guidelines for appropriate types of confidence-building measures, guidelines and recommendations for regional approaches to disarmament within the context of global security, and guidelines and recommendations for objective information on military matters.

2. INTERNATIONAL LAW COMMISSION

Article 1, paragraph 1, of the Statute of the International Law Commission provides that the “Commission shall have for its object the promotion of the progressive development of international law and its codification”. In practice, the Commission’s work on a topic usually involves some aspects of the progressive development as well as the codification of international law, with the balance between the two varying depending on the particular topic.

The Commission has worked extensively in the field of international criminal law, beginning with the formulation of the Nurnberg principles and the consideration of the question of international criminal jurisdiction at its first session, in 1949, and culminating in the completion of the draft Statute for an International Criminal Court at its forty-sixth session, in 1994, and the draft code of Crimes against Peace and Security of Mankind at its forty-eighth session, in 1996.

CATEGORY VII – RELATED ORGANIZATIONS OF SECURITY COUNCIL
Under this category the following organizations are described.
1. CTBTO – Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization
2. IAEA – International Atomic Energy Agency
3. OPCW – Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons
4. WTO – World Trade Organization

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *