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The Ohm's law states that at constant temperature the current flowing through a conductor is directly proportional to the potential difference across its ends . This means that I proportional to V. Two equate this we need to add a constant. This we get V=R*I . But why can't we write the same equation by adding a constant on the other side as I=R*V . How do we know which side to add the constant and how?


Solution

It's not like that.
we found that 
I  proportional to V.
I=constant ×V
I= c×V
thus can also be written as 
I×(1/c) = V.
(1/c) is another constant.
we can write it in both ways.
later it was found that constant which varies with material ,its size,length etc.
this constant when named as resistance when used as (1/c) in the equation metioned above,and it is called conductance when used as 'c'.
hope you understand.all the best.

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