Define Molal Elevation Constant And Molal Depression Constant

Molal elevation constant:

Molal elevation constant can be defined as the elevation in boiling point produced when one mole of solute is dissolved in 1 kg i.e. 1000 g of the solvent. It is also known as the ebullioscopic constant.

If T0b is the boiling point of the pure solvent and Tb is the boiling point of the solution then elevation in boiling point is given as

∆Tb =T0b-Tb

Experimental results show that there is a relation between elevation in boiling point and molality ‘m’ of the solute present in solution

∆Tb ∝ m

∆Tb = kb m

Where,

kb = molal elevation constant

Substituting the value of ‘m’ in the above relation we get

∆Tb = 1000 x kb x m2 / M2 x m1

Where,

m2 = mass of solvent in g

M= mass of solvent in kg

M= molar mass of solute

Molal depression constant:

The freezing point depression of solutions of nonelectrolytes has been determined to be equal to the molality (m) of the solute times a proportionality constant called the molal freezing point depression constant

If T0is the boiling point of the pure solvent and Tf is the boiling point of the solution then depression in the freezing point is given as

∆T=T0f-Tf

Just like elevation in boiling point, depression in freezing point is also directly related to molality ‘m’.

∆Tf = 1000 x kf x m2 / M2 x m1

Where,

k f = molal depression constant

m2 = mass of solvent in g

M1 = mass of solvent in kg

M2 = molar mass of solute

Was this answer helpful?

 
   

4.5 (17)

(28)
(9)

Choose An Option That Best Describes Your Problem

Thank you. Your Feedback will Help us Serve you better.

Leave a Comment

Your Mobile number and Email id will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*

BOOK

Free Class

Ask
Question