Bones of the Wrist

The wrist comprises 8 bones:

  • Trapezoid
  • Trapezium
  • Scaphoid
  • Capitate
  • Pisiform
  • Hamate
  • Triquetrum
  • Lunate

Bones of the Wrist

Following are the location and the functions of wrist bones.

  • Trapezoid

This bone is named so because of it’s rough, trapezoidal shape. It holds the metacarpal bone of the index finger in place.

  • Trapezium

The shape of the trapezium bone roughly resembles a saddle. It is the place where the wrist connects to the metacarpal of the thumb.

  • Scaphoid

The Scaphoid bone is found between the lateral side of the forearm and the hand. It connects the two rows of bones, namely – the distal row and the proximal row. Interestingly, the scaphoid is one of the most commonly fractured bones in the hand. If fractured, the process of healing is also affected as a part of the scaphoid does not have direct access to blood.

  • Capitate

The capitate is one of the larger bones in the wrist. It is located in the centre of the second row of wrist bones and under the metacarpal bone of the middle finger.

  • Pisiform

The pisiform is a relatively small, rounded bone of the wrist. It is situated in the proximal row of the wrist. Moreover, only one side acts as a joint, articulating with the triquetral bone. It is also important to note that the pisiform is a sesamoid bone – which means the bone is embedded within a tendon (or a muscle).

  • Hamate

When viewed from the top, the hamate is a large bone with an almost triangular shape. It is located on the second row of the wrist bones. Anatomically, it supports the ring finger as well as the little finger metacarpal bones. Notably, hamate serves as an attachment point for the ligament that is involved in the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  • Triquetrum

The triquetrum is the bone found on the little finger side of the wrist in the first two rows of the wrist bones. The function of this bone is to provide stability to the wrist. It also makes a joint with the other carpal bones.

  • Lunate

Lunate is a crescent-shaped bone that is covered entirely in cartilage. It is located in the middle of the wrist in the first row of the wrist bones. Due to its unique shape, it allows a greater range of wrist motion.

Frequently Asked Questions on Bones of the Wrist

What are the bones of the Wrist?

The wrist comprises the following bones:

  • Trapezoid
  • Trapezium
  • Scaphoid
  • Capitate
  • Pisiform
  • Hamate
  • Triquetrum
  • Lunate

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