Erythropoietin

What is Erythropoietin (EPO)?

Erythropoietin is a hormone secreted by the kidneys. Alternatively, it is called, erythropoetin, haemopoietin or haematopoietin.

What does Erythropoietin do?

Erythropoietin is responsible for promoting the formation of RBC’s in the bone marrow. The process of production of red blood cells is called erythropoiesis.

How is Erythropoietin detected in the blood?

Clinical diagnosis of Erythropoietin levels can be done through EPO Test.

What is the significane of EPO Test?

An EPO test can help diagnose disorders that may affect red blood cells, such as anaemia and hypoxemia that arises due to chronic lung disease. Moreover, erythropoietin can be synthesized and used to treat some forms of anaemia.

Where exactly is Erythropoietin produced in the body?

Erythropoietin is produced by the kidneys, specifically by the interstitial fibroblasts, in close association with the peritubular capillary and the proximal convoluted tubule. Interestingly, erythropoietin is also produced by the liver during the fetal and perinatal period by the perisinusoidal cells.

Erythropoietin – As a PED

In the realm of sports, Erythropoietin has been used as a performance-enhancing drug until the early 2000s. It was used most notably in cycling. Since the introduction of testing methodologies, the use of EPO has been banned.

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Frequently Asked Questions on Erythropoietin

What is Erythropoietin (EPO)?

Erythropoietin is a hormone secreted by the kidneys that is responsible for promoting the formation of RBCs in the bone marrow.

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