Neutralization In Everyday Life

When acids and bases react, they result in the formation of salt and water as product and this reaction is called neutralization reaction. In our everyday life we come across many situations which involve neutralization reactions. The following examples will illustrate common neutralization reactions that occur around us.

During indigestion, too much of acid is produced inside the stomach resulting in stomach disorder or acidity. In order to retrieve the pain we take bases such as milk of magnesia which contains magnesium hydroxide. Taking a base neutralizes the effect of excess acid.

Second is the effect of ant sting which is caused by formic acid which is neutralized by rubbing moist baking soda (basic in nature) which contains zinc carbonate.

Neutralization

Whenever we eat something, the food molecules are decomposed by micro-organisms present in the mouth which further results in the formation of acid. This acid is responsible for the tooth decay. Toothpastes help in neutralizing the effect of acid because they are alkaline in nature and neutralize the effect of acid. Have you ever noticed that why our hairs get rough after applying shampoo and again turn shiny after we add conditioner? This is because our shampoo is basic in nature and conditioner is acidic in nature and that’s why it neutralizes the effect of the shampoo.

Plants tend to grow in soil that has a very particular pH range. If the soil is acidic then we cannot grow plants in that soil. In order to grow plants in these type of soil we have to add a basic compound such as limestone, powdered lime and the ashes of burnt wood in the soil. On the other hand the basic soil can be treated with the compost of vegetables which are rotten. This restores the pH of the soil by neutralizing the effect of excess acids and bases in the soil.


Practise This Question

In a closed container of constant volume, the pressure of water exhibits an interesting dependence on temperature - 

The point D (273.16 K,0.006 atm) is called the triple point, Tp, of water, where all there phases coexist. What is the observed phase change when the temperature is increased from -100C to +100C, while maintaining a constant pressure of 0.006 atm?