Uses of Amines

What are Amines?

Amines are organic compounds and functional groups which contain a basic nitrogen atom with a lone pair of electrons.

Amines are derivatives of ammonia where one or more hydrogen atom is replaced by substituent such as alkyl or aryl group. Important amines include amino acids, biogenic amines and aniline.

Amines are inorganic derivatives of ammonia, and so they are characterized by a distinctive unpleasant smell that is very similar to rotting fishes. They play a very significant role in the survival of life as they are involved in creating amino acids. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins in human beings. Many vitamins are also made from amino acids.

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List of Uses of Amines

  • Amines are largely used in pharmaceutical industry. Morphine and Demerol are used as analgesics that are pain killers.
  • Novocaine is used as anaesthetic and Ephedra is a very common decongestant. We use tetramethyl ammonium iodide for disinfecting drinking water.
  • In daily life activities amines are used for pest control and tanning of leather. They find large applications in man-made dyes.
  • Methamphetamines and amphetamines are recreational drugs. They are basic in nature with pH value above seven. Being basic in nature they are neutralized by the action of acids.
  • The neutralization reaction result in the formation of alkylammonium salts which has many industrial uses.
  • Choline is one of these salts which plays a significant role in the production of neurotransmitters in human body to make the brain function properly.
  • Serotonin is a primary neurotransmitter, it controls the feeling of hunger and the speed with which the brain functions generally.
  • Amines are used in making azo-dyes and nylon apart from medicines and drugs. They are widely used in developing chemicals for crop protection, medication and water purification.
  • They also find use in products of personal care. Ethanol amines are the most common type of amine used in the global market.

Frequently Asked Questions – FAQs

What are examples of amines?

Amino acids, biogenic amines, trimethylamine, and aniline are essential amines; see Category: Amines for a list of amines. Ammonia inorganic derivatives are also known as amines, for example monochloramine (NClH2). The amino group is called the substituent -NH2.

Why amines are basic in nature?

Owing to the presence of a single pair of electrons on nitrogen, amines are fundamental in nature. By comparing the supply of pairs of electrons on nitrogen, amine basicities can be contrasted with ammonia based on.

Is Amine a base or acid?

Amines can accommodate a hydrogen atom by giving a pair of lone electrons, making them a cornerstone in the Lewis description and the Bronsted-Lowry concept of bases. Main and secondary amines will also give a hydrogen ion under the right conditions rendering it a weak acid under the concept of Bronsted-Lowry.

What is the charge of amine?

An amine ‘s general configuration is an atom of nitrogen with a pair of lone electrons and three substituents. The nitrogen will, however, bind to four substituents, leaving the nitrogen atom with a positive charge. For essential reactions these charged species can serve as intermediates.

What is an amine functional group?

Amines are complexes and chemical groupings containing a lone pair of simple nitrogen atoms. Amines are traditionally ammonia compounds, of which one or two hydrogen atoms is substituted by a substituent such as an alkyl or aryl group.

This article covers the uses of amines and their basic properties. For any further detail install BYJU’S the learning app.

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