Comparative Degree of Comparison - Explore What It Is, Definition, Rules and Examples

The comparative degree is the first level of comparison that can be used to evaluate and differentiate the similar quality or qualities possessed by the subjects in a particular context. In this article, you will be introduced to what a comparative degree is, how it differs from a positive and superlative degree and how it can be used along with examples to help you understand it completely well. Furthermore, there are practice questions given in the article that you can try out in order to check your understanding of the same.

Table of Contents

What is the Comparative Degree? – Meaning and Definition

The comparative degree, as the name suggests, can be used to compare the qualities of two nouns or pronouns to indicate which has the greater or lesser degree of the mentioned quality. The comparative degree, according to the Cambridge Dictionary, is defined as “the form of an adjective or adverb that expresses a difference in amount, number, degree, or quality.” According to the Collins Dictionary, “the comparative form of an adjective or adverb shows that something has more of a quality than something else has.” The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines the comparative degree as one “relating to, or constituting the degree of comparison in a language that denotes increase in the quality, quantity, or relation expressed by an adjective or adverb.”

Points to be Remembered When Using the Comparative Degree of Comparison

  • The very first point you have to bear in mind is that the comparative degree can be used to compare the quality of a subject with another that possesses the same quality.
  • The comparative degree is generally formed by adding ‘-er’ to the end of the adjective followed by ‘than’. This is the case of monosyllabic adjectives.
  • On the contrary, in the case of polysyllabic adjectives, the adjectives remain the same and use the word ‘more’ before the adjective.
  • For monosyllabic adjectives that have a vowel enclosed within two or three consonants, you will have to double the final consonant and then add ‘-er’ to the end of the adjective followed by ‘than’.

Examples of Comparative Degree of Comparison

Here are a few sentences that you can refer to in order to understand how the comparative degree can be used.

  • The weather today is worse than yesterday.
  • Billie Eilish is more liked than Taylor Swift among youngsters nowadays.
  • This is less than what we got yesterday.
  • My grades are better than my last semester.
  • These videos are easier than what we used to play when we were kids.
  • My friends are closer to me than my relatives.
  • This phone is more suitable for me than the other phones.
  • I like playing the guitar more than any other musical instrument.
  • The Glee club is more popular than any other club at school.
  • Your room is messier than I had imagined.

Check Your Understanding of Comparative Degree of Comparison

Fill in the blanks with the right form of the comparative degree of the adjectives given in brackets in the following sentences.

1. Theena is __________ (short) Nimmy.

2. These earrings are ____________ (expensive) the ones we bought last week.

3. Santhosh looks __________ (happy) his friend, Rajesh.

4. The white horses are __________ (active) the black horses.

5. This house is __________ (big) our old house.

6. Trinita is _________ (clever – negative) most of her friends.

7. The puppies are __________ (cute) the kittens.

8. These stories are ____________ (interesting) fantasy novels.

9. These doughnuts are __________ (sweet) the ones we had last Saturday.

10. These sofas are ___________ (comfortable) the ones we bought last year.

Check out your answers from the sentences given below.

1. Theena is shorter than Nimmy.

2. These earrings are more expensive than the ones we bought last week.

3. Santhosh looks happier than his friend, Rajesh.

4. The white horses are more active than the black horses.

5. This house is bigger than our old house.

6. Trinita is not cleverer than most of her friends.

7. The puppies are cuter than the kittens.

8. These stories are more interesting than fantasy novels.

9. These doughnuts are sweeter than the ones we had last Saturday.

10. These sofas are more comfortable than the ones we bought last year.

Frequently Asked Questions on Comparative Degree of Comparison

What do you mean by the comparative degree of comparison?

The comparative degree, as the name suggests, can be used to compare the qualities of two nouns or pronouns to indicate which has the greater or lesser degree of the mentioned quality.

What is the definition of the comparative degree of comparison?

The comparative degree, according to the Cambridge Dictionary, is defined as “the form of an adjective or adverb that expresses a difference in amount, number, degree, or quality.” According to the Collins Dictionary, “the comparative form of an adjective or adverb shows that something has more of a quality than something else has.” The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines the comparative degree as one “relating to, or constituting the degree of comparison in a language that denotes increase in the quality, quantity, or relation expressed by an adjective or adverb.”

What are the points to be remembered when using the comparative degree of comparison?

  • The comparative degree is generally formed by adding ‘-er’ to the end of the adjective followed by ‘than’. This is the case of monosyllabic adjectives.
  • On the contrary, in the case of polysyllabic adjectives, the adjectives remain the same and use the word ‘more’ before the adjective.
  • For monosyllabic adjectives that have a vowel enclosed within two or three consonants, you will have to double the final consonant and then add ‘-er’ to the end of the adjective followed by ‘than’.

Give some examples of the comparative degree of comparison.

Here are a few examples to show you how to use the comparative degree of
comparison.

  • Billie Eilish is more liked than Taylor Swift among youngsters nowadays.
  • These videos are easier than what we used to play when we were kids.
  • My friends are closer to me than my relatives.
  • This phone is more suitable for me than the other phones.
  • I like playing the guitar more than any other musical instrument.

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