Calorimeter Questions

A calorimeter is an apparatus used for calculating the heat developed during a chemical, mechanical or electrical reaction. It also helps to measure the heat capacity of various materials. When two objects of different temperatures (ideally a liquid or a solid) come in contact with each other, then the heat is transmitted from the warmer object to the colder object, until a state of thermal equilibrium is reached between them. The object at a higher temperature dissipates heat, while the object at a lower temperature absorbs heat energy. The concept of calorimetry is built around the law of conservation energy. Inside a closed system, the heat energy lost by a hot object is equivalent to the total heat energy absorbed by the cold body.

Heat Lost = Heat Gained

The heat transfer in a system is calculated using the formula,

q=mcΔt

Where

q is the value of heat transfer

m is the object’s mass

c is the object’s specific heat

Δt is the change in the temperature

Accelerated Rate Calorimeters, Differential Scanning Calorimeters, Titration Calorimeters, and Isothermal Micro Calorimeters are the most common types of calorimeters. A standard calorimeter simply comprises a thermometer connected to a metal vessel full of water hanging above a combustion chamber. It is one of the measurement apparatuses employed in the study of chemistry, biochemistry and thermodynamics.

For calculating the enthalpy change per mole of a substance X in an interaction between two substances X and Y, these substances are independently transferred to a calorimeter. The initial and final temperature readings are noted. The value of the energy absorbed or dissipated during the reaction can be calculated by multiplying the specific heat capacities of the substances by the mass and the temperature change. Dividing the mole number of X by the energy change gives an enthalpy change of reaction.

There is a wide variety of calorimeters. A bomb calorimeter is one among the widespread calorimeters. It is made of an enclosure in which the interactions occur, enveloped by a fluid such as water that sucks the heat of the reaction, and consequently increases in temperature. The value of this temperature rise, the quantity of the weight, and the heat properties of the liquid and container allows the total amount of heat produced to be calculated.

Important Calorimeter Questions with Answers

1) What is a calorimeter?

A calorimeter is an apparatus used for calculating the heat developed during a chemical, mechanical or electrical reaction. It also helps to measure the heat capacity of various materials.

2) What is the principle behind a calorimeter?

When two objects of different temperatures (ideally a liquid or a solid) come in contact with each other, then the heat is transmitted from the warmer object to the colder object, until a state of thermal equilibrium is reached between them. The object at a higher temperature dissipates heat, while the object at a lower temperature absorbs heat energy. The concept of calorimetry is built around the law of conservation energy. Inside a closed system, the heat energy lost by a hot object is equivalent to the total heat energy absorbed by the cold body.

3) What is the formula for heat transfer?

The heat transfer in a system is calculated using the formula,

q=mcΔt

Where

q is the value of heat transfer

m is the object’s mass

c is the object’s specific heat

Δt is the change in the temperature

4) What are the common types of calorimeters?

Accelerated Rate Calorimeters, Differential Scanning Calorimeters, Titration Calorimeters, and Isothermal Micro Calorimeters are the most common types of calorimeters.

5) What are the main components of a calorimeter?

A standard calorimeter simply comprises a thermometer connected to a metal vessel full of water hanging above a combustion chamber.

6) How is the enthalpy change of a substance calculated?

For calculating the enthalpy change per mole of a substance X in an interaction between two substances X and Y, these substances are independently transferred to a calorimeter. The initial and final temperature readings are noted. The value of the energy absorbed or dissipated during the reaction can be calculated by multiplying the specific heat capacities of the substances by the mass and the temperature change. Dividing the mole number of X by the energy change gives an enthalpy change of reaction.

7) What is a bomb calorimeter?

A bomb calorimeter is one among the widespread calorimeters. It is made of an enclosure in which the interactions occur, enveloped by a fluid such as water that sucks the heat of the reaction, and consequently increases in temperature. The value of this temperature rise, the quantity of the weight, and the heat properties of the liquid and container allows the total amount of heat produced to be calculated.

8) Inside a closed system, the heat energy lost by a hot object is equivalent to the total heat energy ______ by the cold body.

Answer: absorbed
Explanation: Inside a closed system, the heat energy lost by a hot object is equivalent to the total heat energy absorbed by the cold body.

9) The concept of calorimetry is built around the law of _______.

Answer: conservation energy

Explanation: The concept of calorimetry is built around the law of conservation energy.

10) What is the main component of a calorimeter?

Thermometer is the main component of a calorimeter.

Related Topics

Practice Questions

1) What is meant by calorimetry?

2) What is meant by specific heat capacity?

3) What is enthalpy?

4) What are the different types of heat transfer?

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