Uses Of Boron And Aluminium - The p-Block Elements

Boron and aluminium belong to the p-block elements of the periodic table. Aluminium is metallic in nature and boron is a metalloid. They are very useful elements and find a variety of applications.

Uses of Boron

Boron is an extremely hard solid, with high melting point, low density and very low electrical conductivity. Boron fibres are used for making bullet- proof vests. The isotope of boron has high ability to absorb neutrons and their metal borides are used in the nuclear industry as protective shields. The compounds of boron – borax and boric acid are used in the manufacture of heat-resistant glasses, glass wool and fibreglass. Moving to borax, it is used as flux for soldering metals and provides stain resistant coating to earthen wares. Borax is also used as a constituent of medicinal soaps. The aqueous solution of orthoboric acid is used as mild antiseptic.

Uses of Aluminium

Aluminium is a silvery metal with high tensile strength; it has high electrical and thermal conductivity. If conductivity is measured on a weight to weight basis, then it is found that aluminium has twice more electrical conductivity than copper. Aluminium forms alloys with copper, zinc, silicon, magnesium, manganese and these alloys find application in day to day used products.

Aluminium is used in various industries and is an important metal. Aluminium and its alloys are used in the making of pipes, tubes, rods or plates. Aluminium foils are thin plates of aluminium which finds application in food storage. Aluminium is also used in making utensils because it has a high heat conducting capacity. Its use though should be reduced and eventually replaced because it is toxic in nature.
In the transport industry, aluminium is used in cars for making the engine blocks, cylinder heads, transmission housings and body panels.

So we have seen the different uses of aluminium and boron. For any query on these topics, call our mentor support team at Byju’s or visit us at byjus.com


Practise This Question

During the high temperature non-aqueous electrolytic extraction of Aluminum from purified Al2O3, the oxygen evolved at the anode reacts with the electrode (graphite). As a result the electrodes are periodically replaced. – True or False?