Difference between Over and Above | Over vs Above

One of the commonly confused prepositions is the pair of these words, i.e. ‘over’ and ‘above’. Most students have often used these words interchangeably, thinking they have the same meaning. But do these terms have the same meaning? To end this age-old confusion between these words, one must go through this article. Prepositions are an essential part of the English Language, so students must learn to use them correctly. This article will discuss how and when students can use the prepositions ‘over’ and ‘above’. The following points will be beneficial for students to clear whatever confusion they have regarding these words.

Table Summarising the Difference between Over and Above

Over

Above

Meaning

The word over means upwards or a higher/elevated position than the other where the first object is in motion.

The term above means overhead. It also means a higher/elevated position than the other and not touching.

Usage

It is used as an Preposition and an Adverb.

It is used as a Preposition and an Adverb.

Example

The dog jumped over the wall.

The water is dripping from above.

As you can see, the commonly confused prepositions ‘over’ and ‘above’ are not the same, and one can’t use them interchangeably. Students have to understand the context before they use these prepositions in the sentence. Let’s go through the following detailed explanations of these terms.

The Difference between Over and Above – Meaning

Though both ‘over’ and ‘above’ means at an elevated position but in the case of ‘over’, it means a higher/elevated position than the other where the first object is in motion. The word ‘over’ is also used with numbers. For example, “There were over a thousand people in the tournament.” When the term ‘over’ is used as an adverb, it also refers to the termination or finishing off something. For example, “The days of the tyrannical rule of Hitler were over.” The term ‘above’ is used when the two objects are not in contact with one another. When used as an adverb, it simply means overhead. For example, “The Sun is shining brightly above our heads.” The examples below will help students understand a bit more clearly.

Example of Over and Above

The examples below will be beneficial for students to understand ‘over’ and ‘above’ as prepositions.

Over – The cat jumped over the high fence to catch the mouse. (preposition)

Above – The roof above is covered with cobwebs. (preposition)

Over and Above – Conclusion

This article shows how ‘over’ and ‘above’ are different from one another, thus helping students understand the difference between them. Apart from this, BYJU’S also offers various articles on many such ‘differences between two words’ that students often get confused with.

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