RBSE Class 8 Science Chapter 7: Blood Circulation Solutions

RBSE Class 8 Science Chapter 7 Blood Circulation solutions have been provided here. We have added a lot of additional questions and answers so that students can get all their concepts understood in detail. We have covered questions from all the concepts taught in the chapter Blood Circulation.

If you are searching for a reliable resource for RBSE solutions for Class 8, then you have arrived at the correct juncture. Here, you will get the most accurate and elaborate solutions to the questions of your textbook, as well as additional questions based on various topics taught in the textbook. This will help you get ready to excel in your examinations.

Rajasthan Board Class 8 Science Chapter 7: BYJU’S Important Questions & Answers

RBSE Class 8 Science Chapter 7 Objective Questions: Textbook Important Questions and Solutions

Q1. Amount of water in blood plasma is about :

(A) 70%

(B) 90%

(C) 10%

(D) 45%

Answer: (B) 90%

Q2. Red corpuscles are also known as:

(A) RBC

(B) WBC

(C) Platelets

(D) Pulse

Answer: (A) RBC

Q3.Which of the following causes the red colour of the blood?

(A) Fibrin

(B) Antigen

(C) Haemoglobin

(D) Platelet

Answer: (C) Haemoglobin

Q4. How many times does the heart of an adult man beat in a minute?

(A) 50 times

(B) 72 times

(C) 110 times

(D) 120 times

Answer: (B) 72 times

RBSE Class 8 Science Chapter 7 Fill in the blanks: Textbook Important Questions and Solutions

Q1. ___________ kills the bacteria that enters into the body.

Answer: WBC

Q2. There are ___________ groups of blood.

Answer: four

Q3. Impure blood is brought back to the heart by ___________.

Answer: veins

Q4. Blood containing carbon dioxide is purified in the ___________.

Answer: Lungs

RBSE Class 8 Science Chapter 7 Answer in one word: Textbook Important Questions and Solutions

Q1. Name the corpuscles that clot the blood.

Answer: Platelets (also called Thrombocytes)

Q2. What keeps the blood in liquid form.

Answer: Plasma

Q3. How many chambers are there in the heart?

Answer: Four

Q4. How many types of antigens are there?

Answer: Two

RBSE Class 8 Science Chapter 7 Short Answer Type Questions: Textbook Important Questions and Solutions

Q1. Name the various blood vessels.

Answer: Broadly, there are two types of blood vessels: Artery and Vein.

Smaller arteries divided into thinner tubules are called Capillaries.

Q2. How many types of blood corpuscles are there? Name them.

Answer: The blood corpuscles are divided into three categories. They are:

(i) Erythrocytes or Red Blood Corpuscles (RBC)

(ii) Leukocytes or White Blood Corpuscles (WBC)

(iii) Thrombocytes or Platelets

Q3. Why are white blood cells called the soldiers of the body?

Answer: The white blood cells are called the soldiers of the body because they are responsible for protecting our bodies from infective pathogens and parasites.

Q4. Write the functions of blood.

Answer: The functions of blood are as follows:

(i) It is responsible to maintain body temperature.

(ii) It transports oxygen as well as carbon dioxide to various parts of our body.

(iii) It demolishes the infective pathogens and viruses.

(iv) It removes the dead and mutilated cells of our body.

(v) It prevents the flow of blood after injuries by creating blood clots.

(vi) It also transports the nutrients and wastes.

Q5. What will happen if a clot is not formed on an injury?

Answer: If a clot is not formed on an injury by the platelets, then it can cause excessive loss of blood and thus can even be fatal.

RBSE Class 8 Science Chapter 7 Long Answer Type Questions: Textbook Important Questions and Solutions

Q6. Describe the structure of the heart with a diagram.

Answer:

RBSE Class 8 Chapter 7 Blood Circulation Solutions

Heart is placed in the thoracic cavity. It is important to keep the oxygenated and deoxygenated blood separate. In order to do so, the heart is divided into four chambers. The upper two chambers are called auricles and the lower two chambers are known as ventricles.

The blood is pumped to different parts of the body by the contraction and expansion of heart. Not only does blood get pumped from the heart to other parts of the body but also blood from different parts of the body reaches the heart through veins. This blood contains more carbon dioxide content. So, this is sent to the lungs, where it gets oxygenated. The oxygenated blood again comes to the heart and then it is pumped out to other parts of the body.

Q7. Write a short note on

(a). Blood Group (b). Blood Bank

Answer: (a) Blood Group:

A scientist by the name Karl Landsteiner came up with the concept of Blood Groups for the first time in the history of mankind. He categorized the human blood into 4 blood groups: A, B, AB, and O.

He realized that in order to perform blood transfusion, it is necessary that the donor’s and recipient’s blood groups are the same. In case, it is not so, the blood will begin to clot and hinder the flow of blood in the body. This can result in death of the recipient.

(b) Blood Bank:

The concept of blood group has proven beneficial to the people who become deficient of blood due to any reason: accident, injury or improper diet. In such a case, blood of suitable blood group can be transfused to the person having lack of blood.

The donor of the blood can be a relative or a known person.

If there is no relative or known person with the required blood group, then one can take help from the blood bank. Blood banks are where blood of various blood groups are stored. The government has opened blood banks in every district hospital. Also, there are private hospitals that render this service. Under appropriate conditions, blood can be stored for a period of 30 days in the blood banks.

RBSE Class 8 Science Chapter 7 Additional Important Questions and Solutions

Q8. Define Blood.

Answer: Blood is the red-coloured fluid present in our bodies to transport substances to various parts of our body.

Q9. What are the two parts of human blood? Which form are they present in?

Answer: There are two parts of human blood. They are:

(i) Plasma in liquid form

(ii) Corpuscles in solid form

Q10. Which type of tissue is blood?

Answer: Blood is a loose connective tissue. Such loose connective tissues help in keeping organs in place.

Q11. Where are RBCs formed?

Answer: RBCs or the Red Blood Corpuscles are formed in the Bone Marrow. Bone marrow contains stem cells. These stem cells can develop into the red blood cells.

Q12. What is oxyhaemoglobin?

Answer: Oxyhaemoglobin is the form in which oxygen is carried to the whole body by Haemoglobin.

Q13. Is blood plasma acidic, alkaline or neutral in nature? Why?

Answer: Blood plasma is alkaline in nature. This is because of the presence of inorganic alkaline salts.

Q14. What are the functions of RBCs?

Answer: Functions of RBCs are:

(i) to transport the oxygen to every cell of the body

(ii) to maintain a constant body temperature

Q15. What is the structure of the Red Blood Corpuscles?

Answer: The Red Blood Corpuscles are round in shape, disk-like. They are flattened at both sides. They are also enucleated.

Q16. Explain the structure of White Blood Corpuscles?

Answer: The White Blood Corpuscles are larger than the Red Blood Corpuscles and are nucleated. They have an irregular shape, just like amoebas. They do not consist of any pigmentation and that’s why they are colourless.

Q17. What are the functions of the White Blood Corpuscles?

Answer: The functions of the White Blood Corpuscles are:

(i) They keep the body healthy by demolishing the infective pathogens and parasites.

(ii) They perform phagocytosis of the dead and mutilated cells. Phagocytosis is the mechanism by which pathogens are removed from the body.

Q18. Explain the structure of Platelets.

Answer: Platelets or thrombocytes are small in size. They are non-nucleated. They are less in numbers and are formed in bone marrow.

Q19. What are the functions of the thrombocytes?

Answer: The primary function of the thrombocytes or platelets is to regulate the flow of blood post injuries. Injuries such as accidents can cause major blood loss. The platelets are responsible to regulate the blood flow. They help in clotting the blood in order to stop bleeding.

Q20. What are the differences between arteries and veins?

Answer: Here are the differences between arteries and veins:

Arteries Veins
1. Walls of arteries are thick. 1. Walls of veins are thinner than that of arteries.
2. The flow of the blood has high pressure. 2. The flow of blood has low pressure.
3. Arteries do not have valves. 3. Veins have valves.
4. The blood that they carry is rich in oxygen. 4. The blood that they carry is deoxygenated.
5. They carry blood from the heart to various parts of the body. 5. They carry blood from various parts of the body to the heart.

Q21. What are the types of proteins in the blood?

Answer: There are two types of proteins in the blood. They are:

(i) antigens: In human blood, there are two types of antigens- antigen ‘A’ and antigen ‘B’

(ii) antibody: In human blood, there are two types of antibodies- antibody ‘a’ and antibody ‘b’

Q22. Define donor and receiver of blood.

Answer: The donor is the one who donates or gives the blood. The one who receives the blood is called the receiver of blood.

Q23. What happens if blood of another blood group is transfused to a person?

Answer: In case blood of another blood group is transfused to a person, blood gets clotted. This results in hindrance in the blood flow. This can lead to the death of the person who has been transfused with the blood of another blood group.

Q24. When do blood clots form?

Answer: The blood clots can be formed only when antigen A and antibody a; or antigen B and antibody b are present in the body at the same time. The flow of blood is hindered by this clotting of blood.

Q25. How is the knowledge of blood groups proven beneficial?

Answer: The knowledge of blood groups have proven to be beneficial because this encourages blood donation and segregation of blood, as per their blood groups. Thus, making it easier to get the required blood group during injuries, accidents or diseases from the blood banks.

Q26. How is the knowledge of blood groups helped in the field of law?

Answer: The knowledge of blood groups have helped in the field of law and judgement as criminals can be recognized by testing their DNA that’s obtained from blood.

Q27. What do we mean by Blood Transfusion?

Answer: Blood Transfusion is the process by which blood is transferred to a body that has a deficiency of blood. For this, the donor’s and recipient’s blood is matched and then blood is transferred.

Q28. Who was the founder of the concept of “Blood Groups”? Name the various blood groups.

Answer: A scientist by the name Karl Landsteiner brought up the concept of Blood Groups for the first time in the history of mankind.

He categorized the human blood into four blood groups: A, B, AB and O.

Q29. Which blood group is called a universal donor? Why?

Answer: Blood group O is called a universal donor. This is because a person with blood group O can donate blood to another person with any blood group.

Q30. Which blood group is known as a universal recipient? Why?

Answer: Blood group AB is known as a universal recipient. This is because a person with blood group AB can receive blood from another person with any blood group.

Q31. How is blood stored in blood banks? Can it be stored for how many days in the blood banks?

Answer: In order to store the blood safely, preserved sodium nitrate is added to the blood. Blood can be stored for 30 days in the blood banks.

Q32. Where do Blood Banks get blood from? How?

Answer: Blood Banks get blood from blood donations done by people. Blood tests are carried out on the donor’s blood. If the blood is suitable, then the blood is collected and stored in the blood banks.

Q33. What do we mean by Pulse Rate?

Answer: Pulse rate is defined as the number of heartbeats per minute. A pulse is produced when the ventricles contract. That’s the reason why heart rate and pulse rate are one and the same thing.

Q34. What happens during a heart beat?

Answer: During a heart beat, a pumping action takes place. The ventricles and auricles contract and relax alternately to pump blood through the heart. One contraction and one expansion is called a heartbeat.

Q35. How can we find the size of our heart?

Answer: To find the size of our heart, we can fold our fingers inside so as to form a fist. The size of our heart is the size of our fist.

Q36. How is the mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood prevented?

Answer: The mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood is prevented by the presence of chambers in the heart. Heart is divided into 4 chambers. This division between chambers restricts the mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood.

Q37. What is impure blood? What happens to the impure blood?

Answer: The blood that comes from various parts of the body through veins contains a lot of Carbon Dioxide. This blood is called impure blood.

The impure blood goes in the lungs and there it gets oxygenated. This oxygenated blood again enters the heart and then it is pumped to various parts of the body.

Q38. How do the doctors get an idea of the health of a person? What equipment can be used for it?

Answer: Doctors get an idea of the health of a person by counting his/her pulse rate or the heart beat. Stethoscope is the equipment that is used to measure the pulse rate or heart beat of a person.

Q39. Name the diseases that can be caused by the infection in blood.

Answer: There are many diseases that can be caused by the infection in blood. For instance, AIDS, Hepatitis B, Blood Cancer, etc. AIDS is caused by a virus called HIV.

Q40. What are the conditions to donate blood?

Answer: Anyone can donate blood who is:

(i) between the age group of 18-60 years

(ii) Weighs above 50 kg

(iii) Is not suffering from diseases such as AIDS, hepatitis B or C, malaria, etc.

(iv) has not donated blood in the previous 3 months

(v) has not undergone a surgery in last 6 months

(vi) has a haemoglobin of 12.5 or more

(vii) has a normal blood pressure

(viii) has a normal body temperature and pulse rate

(ix) is not pregnant

Q41. What is the function of an artery?

Answer: An artery is a blood vessel that carries oxygenated blood from the heart to various parts of the body. The walls of arteries are thick. Arteries are also flexible as the pressure of blood is fast. In order to reach every tissue, the arteries divide into smaller vessels and they get divided into much smaller tubules called the capillaries.

Q42: What is the function of veins?

Answer: Veins are responsible for bringing in the blood from various parts of the body and then bring it to the heart. Veins allow the blood only to flow towards the heart. Walls of veins are thinner in comparison to the walls of arteries. Capillaries in the tissues combine again into veins.

Q43: What are Blood Vessels? Explain its categories in detail.

Answer: Blood is transported in the body by heart through the blood vessels. The blood vessels are categorised into two: Artery and Vein. Let’s talk about them in detail.

An artery is a blood vessel that carries oxygenated blood from the heart to various parts of the body. The walls of arteries are thick. Arteries are also flexible as the pressure of blood is fast. In order to reach every tissue, the arteries divide into smaller vessels and they get divided into much smaller tubules called the capillaries.

Veins are responsible for bringing in the blood from various parts of the body and then bring it to the heart. Veins allow the blood only to flow towards the heart. Walls of veins are thinner in comparison to the walls of arteries. Capillaries in the tissues combine again into veins.

Q44: Explain the importance of Blood Group.

Answer: A scientist by the name Karl Landsteiner came up with the concept of Blood Groups for the first time in the history of mankind. He categorized the human blood into 4 blood groups: A, B, AB, and O.

He realized that in order to perform blood transfusion, it is necessary that the donor’s and recipient’s blood groups are the same. In case, it is not so, the blood will begin to clot and hinder the flow of blood in the body. This can result in death of the recipient.

The knowledge of blood groups have proven to be beneficial because this encourages blood donation and segregation of blood, as per their blood groups. Thus, making it easier to get the required blood group during injuries, accidents or diseases from the blood banks.

The knowledge of blood groups have helped in the field of law and judgement as criminals can be recognized by testing their DNA that’s obtained from blood.

Q45. Explain the concept of Blood Corpuscles in the human blood.

Answer: The blood corpuscles can be divided into three categories. They are:

(i) Erythrocytes or Red Blood Corpuscles (RBC)

(ii) Leukocytes or White Blood Corpuscles (WBC)

(iii) Thrombocytes or Platelets

Let’s now discuss the structure and function of each of the above mentioned types of blood corpuscles.

(i) The Red Blood Corpuscles are round in shape, disk-like. They are flattened at both sides. And, they are enucleated. RBCs are formed in the Bone Marrow. Bone marrow contains stem cells. These stem cells can develop into the red blood cells.

Functions of RBCs are:

– to transport the oxygen to every cell of the body

– to maintain a constant body temperature

(ii) The White Blood Corpuscles are larger than the Red Blood Corpuscles and are nucleated. They have an irregular shape, just like amoebas. They do not consist of any pigmentation and that’s why they are colourless.

Functions of the WBCs are:

– keep the body healthy by demolishing the infective pathogens and parasites.

– perform phagocytosis of the dead and mutilated cells. Phagocytosis is the mechanism by which pathogens are removed from the body.

(iii) Platelets or thrombocytes are small in size. They are non-nucleated. They are less in numbers and are formed in Bone marrow.

Function of Platelets:

– to regulate the flow of blood post injuries. Injuries such as accidents can cause major blood loss. The platelets are responsible to regulate the blood flow. They help in clotting the blood in order to stop bleeding.

Q46. Explain the parts of human blood.

Answer: The human blood is the red-coloured fluid present in our bodies to transport substances to various parts of our body. The human blood consists of two parts:

(i) Plasma

(ii) Corpuscles

The plasma is a sticky, transparent liquid substance. It is light yellow in colour. 50-60% of blood comprises plasma. Usually, it contains 90% water and 10% organic substances. It is alkaline as it contains inorganic alkaline salts. Plasma is responsible for the fluidity of blood.

The corpuscles are in solid form. They form around 40% of blood. The blood corpuscles are divided into three categories- Red Blood Corpuscles, White Blood Corpuscles and Platelets. The RBCs are also called Erythrocytes. WBCs are also known as Leukocytes and Platelets are also called Thrombocytes.

The Red Blood Corpuscles are round in shape, disk-like. They are flattened at both sides. And, they are enucleated. The White Blood Corpuscles are larger than the Red Blood Corpuscles and are nucleated. They have an irregular shape, just like amoebas. They do not consist of any pigmentation and that’s why they are colourless. Platelets or thrombocytes are small in size. They are non-nucleated.

We hope that the above questions will provide you with a clearer understanding of the lesson and cover all the concepts of your RBSE textbook. All the solutions given here are drafted by our team of subject-matter experts who have an in-depth knowledge of the way the solutions are expected from the students in their exams. Visit us regularly to be updated about all the resources related to your studies. Keep Learning!

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