UPSC 2017: Comprehensive News Analysis - July 03

TABLE OF CONTENT

A. GS1 Related
History / Environment & Ecology
1. Thirsty Vijayapura reaches into ancient bawadis 21 huge open wells, built around 500 years ago, 
are filling up after desilting and providing a vital source of water for the arid city
B. GS2 Related
International Relations
1. Pakistan denies consular access to Jadhav yet again Says equating him with other prisoners is 
‘travesty of logic’
2. On eve of PM’s tour, Palestine hopes to keep India ties firm Modi will be in Tel Aviv & Jerusalem
from July 4; will not travel to Palestinian side
3. Step back Sustained tension at the Bhutan tri-junction suits neither China nor India
C. GS3 Related
Economics
1. GST positive for India’s credit profile: Moody’s ‘To support higher government revenue through 
improved tax compliance’
2. Steel sector bullish on GST, exporters worry Reactions abound on impact of tax
Environment and Ecology
1. Aerosols ‘shrinking’ India’s monsoon Greenhouse gases cause concern, but scientists are more 
worried about particulates
2. Nine more bird, biodiversity areas in Kerala
D. GS4 Related
E. Concepts-in-News: Related Concepts to Revise/Learn
F. Bills/Acts/Schemes/Orgs in News
G. Practice Questions for UPSC Prelims Exam

 

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UPSC Current Affairs 2017: News Analysis

 

 
A. GS1 Related


Category: HISTORY / ENVIRONMENT AND ECOLOGY

1. Thirsty Vijayapura reaches into ancient bawadis 21 huge open wells, built around 500 years ago, are filling up after desilting and providing a vital source of water for the arid city

In news:

  • 21 huge, open wells, built around 500 years ago, are filling with water after desilting and providing a vital source of water for this arid city in Karnataka.
  • A little over two months ago, the historic Taj bawadi (huge open wells), built during the Adil Shahi era (1490-1686) in Vijayapura in Karnataka was a filthy cesspool, with the polluted water unfit for any use.
  • Today the 223 ft wide structure has potable water, with hundreds of springs injecting fresh water into it.
  • Built in 1620 in the name of Taj Sultana, the queen of Ibrahim Adil Shah-II, the Taj bawadi is one of 21 such open wells being revived by the district administration in a first ever attempt at cleaning and desilting them.
  • Some of the others being revived are the Chanda Bawadi, Sandal Bawadi, Ibrahimpur Bawadi, Pethi Bawadi and the Gunnapur Bawadi.
  • Dr Rajendra Singh, noted water conservationist, also lauded the work on reviving the water source during his recent visit.

Category: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

1. Pakistan denies consular access to Jadhav yet again Says equating him with other prisoners is ‘travesty of logic’

In news:

  • Pakistan on Sunday again rejected India’s request for consular access to Kulbhushan Jadhav, a former Indian naval officer who was sentenced to death for espionage and terrorism by a Pakistani military court in April this year.
  • His mercy petition is pending with Pakistani Army chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa. India denied the charges made out against Jadhav, and moved the International Court of Justice against the conviction and got a stay on the execution. Pakistan insists that the reprieve is temporary.

2. On eve of PM’s tour, Palestine hopes to keep India ties firm Modi will be in Tel Aviv & Jerusalem from July 4; will not travel to Palestinian side

Context:

  • Modi will travel to Tel Aviv and Jerusalem from July 4, and will be the first Indian Prime Minister to visit Israel.

In News:

  • India’s relations with Israel should not come at the “expense of ties” with Palestine, but the Palestinian Authority (PA) understands the need for India to de-hyphenate ties with both, says the Palestinian President’s diplomatic adviser Dr. Majdi ElKhaldi in an interview ahead of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Israel.

3. Step back Sustained tension at the Bhutan tri-junction suits neither China nor India

Context:

  • The boundary stand-off with China at the Doka La tri-junction with Bhutan is by all accounts unprecedented; it demands calmer counsel on all sides. The tri-junction stretch of the boundary at Sikkim, though contested, has witnessed far fewer tensions than the western sector of the India-China boundary even as India and Bhutan have carried on separate negotiations with China.

Issue:

  • China’s action of sending People’s Liberation Army construction teams with earth moving equipment to forcibly build a road upsets a carefully preserved peace.

Other concerns and issues:

  • Delhi has expressed disappointment over China’s rejection of its concerns on sovereignty issues, and refusal to corner Pakistan on cross-border terrorism or help India’s bid for Nuclear Suppliers Group membership.
  • In turn, India’s spurning of the Belt and Road Initiative and cooperation with the U.S. on maritime issues has not played well in China — neither has the uptick in rhetoric, including statements from the Arunachal Pradesh Chief Minister questioning India’s “One China Policy” on Tibet, and  from Army chief Bipin Rawat on India being prepared for a two-and-a-half front war.

Conclusion and Way Forward:

  • These issues have to be addressed through sustained dialogue.
  • In the immediate term, however, talks must focus on defusing the tensions at the tri-junction.
  • China has made the withdrawal of Indian troops a precondition for dialogue. This would be unacceptable to India, unless the PLA also withdraws its troops and road-building teams.
  • Apart from its own commitments to the status quo, Beijing must recognise the special relationship India and Bhutan have shared since 1947, the friendship treaty of 2007 that commits India to protecting Bhutan’s interests, and the close coordination between the two militaries.
  • For its part, India would be keen to show that it recognises that the face-off is in Bhutanese territory, and the rules of engagement could be different from those of previous India-China bilateral clashes — at Depsang and Demchok in the western sector, for example.
  • Bhutan’s sovereignty must be maintained as that is the basis for the “exemplary” ties between New Delhi and Thimphu.
  • The Indian government has been wise to avoid escalation in the face of China’s aggressive barrage, but that should not stop it from communicating its position in more discreet ways.

 

C. GS3 Related


Category: ECONOMICS

1. GST positive for India’s credit profile: Moody’s ‘To support higher government revenue through improved tax compliance’

In News:

  • The Goods and Services Tax (GST) regime will be positive for India’s credit profile as it will contribute to productivity gains and higher GDP growth as well as support higher government revenue generation through improved tax compliance, according to global ratings agency Moody’s.
  • The GST regime is expected to contribute to ease of doing business and accelerate new ventures

2. Steel sector bullish on GST, exporters worry Reactions abound on impact of tax

  • With India moving towards its biggest tax reform, here’s how various sectors in India have reacted to the implementation of the Goods and Services Tax (GST) and how it will impact business.
  • Following the implementation of the GST, the hospitality and travel sectors expect teething issues in the first few months but are not unduly worried, expecting support from government.
  • The Federation of Indian Export Organisations (FIEO) has approached the government to reduce the restrictions on using duty credit scrips — a pass that allows holders to import goods by not paying a certain amount in import duties.
  • The steel sector is feeling bullish after the GST rollout. Players in the sector said that with GST, unorganised players will have to move to the organised form of doing business.
  • The cotton textile industry is also feeling positive.

Category: ENVIRONMENT AND ECOLOGY

1. Aerosols ‘shrinking’ India’s monsoon Greenhouse gases cause concern, but scientists are more worried about particulates

In news:

  • While greenhouse gases, or GHGs, are causing concern about the long-term fate of the Indian monsoon, researchers now think aerosols from vehicular exhaust, half-burnt crop residue, dust and chemical effluents may be weakening the life-giving rainy season even more than GHGs.

Study Report:

  • An Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, team led by climatologist R. Krishnan studying the likely monsoon impact of GHGs over the next century has come to this conclusion.

Scientists have used new model:

  • The scientist and his team used an upgraded forecasting model that was used this year by the India Meteorological Department for forecasts. The model will help prepare India’s first home-grown forecast of climate change from global warming, and be part of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports.
  • Dust clouds shield the earth from the sun’s rays, depressing land and sea temperatures. The monsoon, which is produced by the difference in temperature between the two, is thus weakened.

2. Nine more bird, biodiversity areas in Kerala

In news:

  • The bird and biodiversity-rich areas in Kerala are drawing global attention with nine more locations being identified as Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs).
  • The newly identified IBAs of Kerala are Achencoil Forest Division; Anamudi Shola National Park; Camel’s Hump Mountain, Wayanad; Kurinjimala Wildlife Sanctuary; Malayattoor Reserve Forest; Mankulam Forest Division; Mathikettan Shola National Park; Muthikulam-Siruvani; and Pampadum Shola National Park.

Who released the list ?

  • The new list was released by the Bombay Natural History Society, a partner of BirdLife International, in its recent publication, Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas in India Priority sites for conservation.
  • The IBAs are “places of international significance for the conservation of birds and other biodiversity” and are “distinct areas amenable to practical conservation action,” according to BirdLife International.
  • Kerala IBAs are home to three critically endangered species — Whiterumped Vulture, Indian Vulture, and Red-headed Vulture.

 

D. GS4 Related


Nothing here for Today!!!

 

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E. Concepts-in-News: Related Concepts to Revise/Learn


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F. Bills/Acts/Schemes/Orgs in News


Nothing here for Today!!!

 

G. Practice Questions for UPSC Prelims Exam


Question 1: In the ancient times, ‘bawadis’ refer to ________.
  1. Water well
  2. Land given to Brahmins for education
  3. Traditional land based tax system
  4. None
See
Answer
Question 2: The historic Taj Bavadi is in which state?
  1. Uttar Pradesh
  2. Bihar
  3. Odisha
  4. Karnataka
See
Answer
Question 3: The Himalayan pass Doka La is in which state?
  1. Himachal Pradesh
  2. Uttarakhand
  3. Sikkim
  4. Arunachal Pradesh
See
Answer
Question 4: Which of the below are Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs)?
  1. Anamudi Shola National Park
  2. Camel’s Hump Mountain, Wayanad
  3. Muthikulam-Siruvani
  4. Kurinjimala Wildlife Sanctuary

Choose the right option from the below given codes.

  1. 1 ,2 and 3 only
  2. 3 and 4 only
  3. 2, 3 and 4 only
  4. 1, 2, 3 and 4
See
Answer
Question 5: Consider the following statements:
  1. Important Bird and Biodiversity Area (IBA) is an initiative of UNEP.
  2. Bombay Natural History Society is a partner of BirdLife International in India.

Which of the above statements is/are correct ?

  1. 1 only
  2. 2 only
  3. Both 1 and 2
  4. None
See
Answer

 

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