Water Transport

The survival of plants is dependent on a number of factors which include water, minerals, gases, and nutrients they receive. The movement of gas, water, and nutrients in plants are carried out in components. They take in carbon dioxide from the air through the stomata present in their leaves and they absorb compounds of nitrogen, phosphorus, etc., from the soil by their roots. If the distance to be traversed is relatively small, diffusion process occurs. As the distances increases in tall trees, a well-developed transportation system arises as these movements of substances have to be facilitated with extreme care.

Water Transport in Plants

Water transport

Movement of water, gases, and nutrients

The amount of energy required by plants is lower compared to that of animals, hence there is a requirement of slower transportation. In plants, a tube-like passage made up of vascular tissues called xylem and phloem are two modes of transportation. Water and minerals travel upwards through the xylem, while phloem transport synthesized food to other parts of the plant. The movement of water and other nutrients from one part of a plant to another is called translocation. Water gets absorbed by osmosis while minerals by active transport. The method used in the upward movement of water through the xylem is determined by the cohesion-tension theory. Here the driving force of transport is transpiration. In this process, cohesion is responsible for driving more water through the xylem and excess water molecules are pulled up by the pulling force which later evaporates through the tiny pores of stomata.

Transpiration

Transpiration

As we all knew plants could not live on water and sugar alone. They need the nutrients that they could not produce by themselves hence they derive from the soil. Macro and micro nutrients are transported through the vascular tissue. Roots absorb nutrients from the soil and transport through the xylem while the phloem takes care of the organic molecules.

Nutrients are transferred to different plant parts, such as new leaves or branches. Plants exchange gases through their leaves. During daytime, plants consume carbon dioxide for photosynthesis and release oxygen as a byproduct which is used for respiration. During night plants consume oxygen required for their respiration and releases carbon dioxide.

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Practise This Question

Identify the process where root pressure is not involved -
A. Oozing out of sap from the cut end of stem.
B. Loss of water vapor from the aerial parts of plant.
C. Reestablishment of continuity of water column in the xylem which often break due to tension.
D. Water loss in liquid phase from vein endings of leaves.