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Question

Current has both magnitude and direction, so why do we consider it a scalar quantity?

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Solution

To be precise, current is not a vector quantity. Although current has a specific direction and magnitude, it does not obey the law of vector addition. Let us take an example.

Take a look at the above picture. According to Kirchhoff's current law, the sum of the currents entering the junction should be equal to the sum of currents leaving the junction. So a current of 10 A leaves the junction.
Now take a look at the picture below.

Here, when we consider current to be a vector quantity, the resultant current is less than that obtained in the previous situation. This could take place due to charge accumulation in some parts of the conductor. This could also take place due to charge leakage. However, this doesn't generally happen. So current is a scalar quantity.

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