CameraIcon
CameraIcon
SearchIcon
MyQuestionIcon
MyQuestionIcon
Question

Explain faradays laws of electrolysis in details.


Open in App
Solution

Electrolysis

  • The reactions of donating and taking up electrons occur during electrolysis.
  • The number of electrons taken by electrolyte ions, or the number of electrons passing through the electrolytes, will determine how much or how many reactions occur.

Faraday's First law of electrolysis

  • Michael Faraday established Faraday's law of electrolysis.
  • According to Faraday's First Law of Electrolysis, the chemical deposition caused by the flow of current through an electrolyte is proportionate to the amount of electricity passing through it.
  • The amount of electricity needed to release one gram-equivalent of any material at any electrode is called a faraday, and it passes through an electrolyte.
  • Faraday's constant is equal to 96485Cmol-1.

Formula of Faraday's first law

mQm=ZQm=ZIt

  • m is the mass of the ions formed or reacted.
  • Q is the electric current.
  • Z is the electrochemical equivalent mass of one-coulomb charge.
  • I is the current.
  • t is the time.
  • When one coulomb equals one electrochemical equivalent mass of a material, one equivalent of electrons flowing per second equals 96485 equivalents mass.

Faraday's second law of electrolysis

  • It states, “The masses of different ions liberated at the electrodes, when the same amount of electricity is passed through different electrolytes are directly proportional to their chemical equivalent weight.”

Formula of Faraday's second law

  • It follows that the electrochemical equivalent of an element is directly proportional to its equivalent weight.

W1W2=E1E2ZE

  • W1,W2 are the deposited amount of any substance.
  • E1,E2 are the equivalent weights of that substance.
  • Z is the electrochemical equivalent.
  • E is the equivalent weight.

flag
Suggest Corrections
thumbs-up
0
BNAT
mid-banner-image