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Rewrite the passage below using capital letters where necessary –

(i) one saturday afternoon amarjit and his little sister rani went for a picnic to india gate. there they saw ducks, water and their friend raj
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(ii) oh dear said the fir tree I like my old needle-like leaves best for goats don't eat them and no man can steal them
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Solution

(i) One Saturday afternoon, Amarjit and his little sister Rani went for a picnic to India Gate. There they saw ducks, water and their friend Raj.

(ii) "Oh dear!", said the Fir tree. "I like my old needle-like leaves best, for goats don't eat them and no man can steal them."


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Q. I. Literary training was a difficult matter. I had neither the resources nor the literary equipment necessary, and I had not the time I would have wished to devote to the subject. We gave three periods at the most to literary training. Hindi, Tamil, Gujarati and Urdu were all taught, and tuition was given through the vernaculars of the boys. English was taught as well.

II. I had undertaken to teach Tamil and Urdu. The little Tamil I knew was acquired during voyages and in jail. I had not got beyond Pope's excellent Tamil handbook. My knowledge of the Urdu script was all that I had acquired on a single voyage, and my knowledge of the language was confined to the familiar Persian and Arabic words. Even my Gujarati was no better than that which one acquires at the school.

III. Such was the capital with which I had to carry on. In poverty of literary equipment my colleagues went one better than I. But my love for the languages of my country, my confidence in my capacity as a teacher, as also the ignorance of my pupils, and more than that, their generosity, stood me in good stead.

IV. Of text-books, about which we hear so much, I never felt the want. I do not even remember having made much use of the books that were available. I did not find it at all necessary to load the boys with quantities of books. I have always felt that the true text-book for the pupil is his teacher. I remember very little that my teachers taught me from books, but I have even now a clear recollection of the things they taught me independently of books.

V. Children take in much more and with less labour through their ears than through their eyes. I do not remember having read any book from cover to cover with my boys. But I gave them, in my own language, all that I had digested from my reading of various books, and I dare say they are still carrying a recollection of it in their minds. It was laborious for them to remember what they learnt from books, but what I imparted to them by word of mouth, they could repeat with the greatest ease. Reading was a task for them, but listening to me was a pleasure, when I did not bore them by failure to make my subject interesting. And from the questions that my talks prompted them to put, I had a measure of their power of understanding.

Adapted from The Story of My Experiments with Truth by M K Gandhi

Based on your understanding of the passage, answer below given question by choosing the correct option.

How did the author describe his language skills before starting the literary training?

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