What is the difference between centromere, centrosome and centriole?

Centrosome and centromere are structures involved in cell division. Centrosomes occur only in animal cells, where they regulate the cell cycle and organize the microtubules. Centromeres occur in all eukaryotic cells and are responsible for the movement of replicated chromosomes to the daughter cells during mitosis and meiosis. Centrosome plays an essential role in the formation of cilia and flagellum. Centrosomes consist of two centrioles and amorphous mass surrounding them called pericentriolar material. They help in maintaining cellular shape.

The centromere is a section of DNA (non-coding) that is responsible for the movement of replicated chromosomes to the daughter cells during mitosis and meiosis. The centromere is a small-sized bubble situated in the primary constriction. Centromere occurs in all eukaryotic cells. The number of centromeres in the cell equals the number of chromosomes.

Centrioles are tube like structures that aid in cell division. They generally are found close to the nucleus and are made up of nine tube-like structures that each have three tubules. The main function of the centriole is to help with cell division in animal cells. The centrioles help in the formation of the spindle fibres that separate the chromosomes during cell division (mitosis). It is a cylindrical cell structure composed of a protein tubulin.

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