Difference between Vascular and Avascular Tissue

What is Vascular Tissue?

The vascular system or the circulatory system is composed of blood vessels and lymphatic systems. The blood vessels are arteries, veins and capillaries. They are involved in the circulation of blood and exchange of oxygen and nutrients in the body. The lymphatic system drains the excess tissue fluid, and also takes part in immune responses. The muscles of the lungs, heart, and kidney are highly vascularised.

What is Avascular Tissue?

Tissues that do not contain blood vessels or lymphatic system are referred to as avascular tissues. Examples of avascular tissue include epithelial cells, cornea of the eye and cartilage. The epithelial cells form a protective layer on the skin, the cornea allows the light to enter the eye and the cartilage is a connective tissue. Exchange of nutrients in avascular tissues takes place through diffusion.

Vascular vs Avascular Tissue

Vascular Tissue

Avascular Tissue

Definition

The tissues that consist of blood vessels and lymphatic systems are referred to as vascular tissue.

The tissues that do not have blood vessels and lymphatic vessels are referred to as avascular tissue.

Exchange of Nutrients

The exchange of gases and nutrients takes place through the vessels.

The exchange of gases and nutrients takes place through diffusion.

Examples

Heart, lung and kidney.

Cornea, cartilage and epithelial cells.

Explore BYJU’S Biology for more interesting topics.

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Frequently Asked Questions on Difference between Vascular and Avascular Tissue

Why does it matter if a tissue is vascular or avascular?

A vascular tissue is well supplied with vessels that allow easy exchange of gases and nutrients.

Which tissue has no vascular supply?

Cartilage is an example of an avascular tissue.

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