Difference Between Endosmosis And Exosmosis

Before we look at the difference between Endosmosis And Exosmosis, let’s brush up the basics of what exactly is “osmosis.” Osmosis is the movement of a solvent (such as water) from a low solute concentration into a solution that has a higher solute concentration through a semipermeable membrane. The flow of this solution stops when equalization happens on both sides of the membrane.

Osmosis is of two types- endosmosis and exosmosis

Endosmosis

When a cell is placed in a hypotonic solution, the water moves inside a cell and swells. This movement of water inside a cell is known as endosmosis. This happens because the solute concentration of the surrounding solution is less than that inside the cytoplasm.

Exosmosis

When a cell is placed in a hypertonic solution, the water moves out of the cell and the cell becomes flaccid. This movement of water out of the cell is known as exosmosis. This happens because the solute concentration of the surrounding solution is higher than that inside the cytoplasm.

Difference Between Endosmosis And Exosmosis

Difference Between Endosmosis And Exosmosis

Difference Between Endosmosis And Exosmosis

Now that we have an understanding of osmosis, endosmosis and exosmosis, let’s find out the striking differences between endosmosis and exosmosis. The major difference between endosmosis and exosmosis are summarized below:

Difference Between Endosmosis And Exosmosis

Endosmosis

Exosmosis

The solvent moves into the cell.

(Endo = inside)

The solvent moves out of the cell.

(Exo = outside)

Osmosis towards the inside of a cell.

Osmosis towards the outside of a cell.

Occurs when there is lower osmotic pressure.

Occurs when the osmotic pressure is higher.

Hypotonic solutions induce endosmosis in cells (distilled water is hypotonic because it contains no solute).

Hypertonic solutions induce exosmosis in cells (Intravenous Fluid is often hypertonic as it has many solutes).

Higher water potential of the surrounding areas when compared to the cytosol (the watery part of cytoplasm in a cell).

Lower water potential of the surrounding areas when compared to the cytosol.

As a result, the cell swells.

As a result, the cell shrinks.

Example: Raisins swell when placed in normal water.

Example: Raisins shrivel when placed in the concentrated salt solution.

Thus we know how the two types of osmosis, endosmosis and exosmosis are different from each other.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is osmosis?

Osmosis is the movement of molecules from a region of lower concentration to a region of higher concentration. Osmosis can be of two types- endosmosis and exosmosis.

What do you mean by endosmosis?

Endosmosis is the movement of the water inside the cells when the cell is placed in a hypotonic solution. This movement of water causes the cell to swell.

What do you mean by exosmosis?

Exosmosis is the movement of water outside the cells when a cell is placed in a hypertonic solution. The cell becomes flaccid by the movement of water outside.

Give a few examples of endosmosis.

Swelling of the raisins and grapes placed in water, absorption of water by the roots, absorption of water in the xylem vessels by the roots are a few examples of endosmosis.

Give a few examples of exosmosis.

Passage of water from root hair cells to cortical cells is an example of exosmosis occurring in plants.

 

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