Conjunctive Adverbs - Explore Meaning, Definition and Examples

Ever heard of ‘conjunctive adverbs’? Do you know what they mean or what they do? Conjunctive adverbs are adverbs that behave like conjunctions when used in a sentence. You can learn all about conjunctive adverbs, how they are used with examples in this article. Check out the topics below to find out more.

Table of Contents

What is a Conjunctive Adverb?

A conjunctive adverb is a part of speech that is an adverb by design but has the characteristic of a conjunction. It can be used to link different clauses or sentences, to show cause and effect, sequence, and contrast between the two clauses or sentences.

Definition of a Conjunctive Adverb

According to the Collins Dictionary, a conjunctive adverb is defined as “serving to connect two clauses or sentences, as however or furthermore.” The word ‘conjunctive’, according to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, is defined as something that is “being or functioning like a conjunction.” The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines the quality of a part of speech being ‘conjunctive’ as “relating to a conjunction (= linking word), or expressing a link between two things that are both true.”

Using Conjunctive Adverbs – Points to Remember

Since conjunctive adverbs have the special feature of behaving like a conjunction, there are a few points you will need to be aware of and bear in mind when using them in your sentences, especially in writing.

  • Rule 1: Always use a comma if the conjunctive adverb is used to link or separate an independent clause and a dependent clause. This rule applies when conjunctions like and, or, so or but are used before the conjunctive adverb.
  • Rule 2: When you are using a conjunctive adverb to link or show the relationship between two independent clauses, make sure you separate them with a semicolon before the conjunctive adverb and a comma after it.
  • Rule 3: When conjunctive adverbs are used to separate or link two independent clauses which have the ability to stand as two distinct sentences, a period can be used in between them and the second clause would begin with the conjunctive adverb.
  • Rule 4: If the conjunctive adverb appears in the beginning of a second clause in a sentence, you should use a comma after the adverb. In case the conjunctive adverb used in the beginning of the second clause is a monosyllabic adverb, a comma need not be used.
  • Rule 5: If the conjunctive adverb is used in the middle of a clause, it should be preceded and followed by a comma. This, however, need not be the case always, especially when conjunctive adverbs are made use of in short clauses.

Examples of Conjunctive Adverbs

Here is a list of conjunctive adverbs with example sentences.

Conjunctive Adverbs

Uses

Sentence Examples

However

Used to denote contrasting opinions, suggestions or statements

Aaron went to many stationery stores in that area; however, he did not find what he was looking for.

Besides

The computer I am thinking of buying does not meet my expectations; besides, it is very expensive.

Instead

Remya had planned to go out with her family to the circus; instead, she went to the beach.

Anyway

Cece wanted to visit the museum yesterday but could not as it was raining. Anyway, we are going today, so we asked her to join us.

Nonetheless

People have been struggling to be financially stable; nonetheless, they are managing to make all ends meet.

Nevertheless

It was raining; nevertheless, we went to the party.

Meanwhile

Asha was washing all the plates; meanwhile, her husband cleaned the house.

Also

Used to add ideas

See to that you carry your umbrella and torchlight when you go for the trip. Also, make sure you take a few copies of your ID proof for verification.

Furthermore

Our parents are coming home this weekend and, furthermore, we will be going to Bangalore.

Besides

The train is already running late. Besides, we got caught in the early morning traffic.

Additionally

Diu Art Cafe is known for its amazing food. Additionally, the cafe often features live music and dance shows.

Moreover

Ajith is an engineer and, moreover, he is a good singer.

Similarly

Used to represent similar ideas and statements or compare two ideas

Adjectives are used to describe nouns. Similarly, you can use adverbs to describe verbs, adjectives or other adverbs.

Likewise

The student who stands in the beginning of the line has to pass the ball and move to the end of the line. Likewise, the next student has to move to the beginning of the line and do the same.

Indeed

Used to emphasise something that is being said

The show went on for so long and indeed, was a great one.

Certainly

Certainly, that was your responsibility.

Undoubtedly

Undoubtedly, this year’s annual day was the best.

Of course

Of course, the western dance is the most anticipated programme of the day.

Consequently

Used to represent cause and effect

Used to express one’s complete agreement with something that is happening or suggested; to show that something is happening as a result of something

I am participating in multiple competitions. Consequently, I will require more time for practice and preparation.

Otherwise

Make sure you carry your ID proof when you are travelling; otherwise, they will not let you travel on the train.

Accordingly

The prices of the materials kept fluctuating every year. Accordingly, we had to adjust the cost of our products.

Then

Pravin moved all the furniture; then, he cleaned the entire house.

Therefore

It became too dark; therefore, we decided not to go to the park.

Thus

Sandy received the maximum votes; thus, became the chairperson of the academic year 2022-23.

Finally

Finally, her parents permitted her to go for the trek.

Hence

The hills are steep, and hence, it is very dangerous to drive at night.

Check Your Understanding of Conjunctive Adverbs

Fill in the blanks by choosing the most appropriate conjunctive adverbs from the list given below.

(undoubtedly, therefore, then, additionally, however, finally, hence, thus, otherwise, certainly)

1. Krithik left home early; ___________, he did not reach school in time for the assembly.

2. You have to work hard; __________, you will not be able to score good marks.

3. We had watched every new movie that was released on Friday. _________, Home was the best movie.

4. Darin was waiting for his result the whole day. ________, the results were published around 6 p.m.

5. The kids were already feeling cold; ____________, we decided not to turn on the AC.

6. The question papers did not reach us on time. __________, that caused a huge discomfort among the students and teachers.

7. You would be informed what all you should carry with you when you come for the trip; ____________, you will be given an itinerary so that you can be well aware of the activities that will take place.

8. The students had not completed their project, and ___________, they were not allowed to go for their games period.

9. I will complete my Chemistry project, and ________, I will start working on the Maths assignment.

10. Aaron practised very well, and ________, he got the second prize.

Let us check if you have understood well.

1. Krithik left home early; however, he did not reach school in time for the assembly.

2. You have to work hard; otherwise, you will not be able to score good marks.

3. We had watched every new movie that was released on Friday. Undoubtedly, Home was the best movie.

4. Darin was waiting for his result the whole day. Finally, the results were published around 6 p. m.

5. The kids were already feeling cold; hence, we decided not to turn on the AC.

6. The question papers did not reach us on time. Certainly, that caused a huge discomfort among the students and teachers.

7. You would be informed what all you should carry with you when you come for the trip; additionally, you will be given an itinerary so that you can be well aware of the activities that will take place.

8. The students had not completed their project, and therefore, they were not allowed to go for their games period.

9. I will complete my Chemistry project, and then, I will start working on the Maths assignment.

10. Aaron practised very well, and thus, got the second prize.

Frequently Asked Questions on Conjunctive Adverbs

What is a conjunctive adverb?

A conjunctive adverb is a part of speech that is an adverb by design but has the characteristic of a conjunction. It can be used to link different clauses or sentences, to show cause and effect, sequence and contrast between the two clauses or sentences.

What is the definition of a conjunctive adverb?

According to the Collins Dictionary, a conjunctive adverb is defined as “serving to connect two clauses or sentences, as however or furthermore.” The word ‘conjunctive’, according to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, is defined as something that is “being or functioning like a conjunction.” The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines the quality of a part of speech being ‘conjunctive’ as “relating to a conjunction (= linking word), or expressing a link between two things that are both true.

Give some examples of conjunctive adverbs.

However, eventually, consequently, finally, otherwise, anyway, moreover, similarly, hence, therefore, thus, accordingly, etc. are some examples of conjunctive adverbs.

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