Stative Verbs - Explore Definition, Usage and Examples

Have you ever heard of stative verbs? What do you think stative verbs mean? Find out if what you guessed is right by reading through this article. Check out the topics discussed below to learn more.

Table of Contents

What are Stative Verbs?

Stative verbs are verbs that are used to describe or indicate the state of being of a noun or pronoun that acts as the subject in a sentence.

Definition of a Stative Verb

A stative verb is defined as “a verb that describes a state and not an action”, according to the Cambridge Dictionary. According to the Collins Dictionary, a stative verb is “a verb describing a state rather than an activity, act, or event, such as know and want as opposed to leave and throw.”

Examples of Stative Verbs and How They Can be Used in Sentences

As discussed, stative verbs are used to represent a state of being and not an action. Some verbs like feel, taste, smell, look and sound that represent the five senses also come under stative verbs.

Let us look at the following examples to understand how they are used.

  • I know what to do with this.
  • I understand exactly what you say.
  • I do not feel very good.
  • None of this concerns you or your brother.
  • All the women are depending on you.

Difference between Stative Verbs and Linking Verbs

Are you wondering what the difference between stative verbs and linking verbs is? Here it is. Check out the table given below.

Stative Verb

Linking Verb

A stative verb is a verb that is used to express the state a subject is in and does not describe an action.

A linking verb, on the other hand, acts as the bridge between the subject and the subject complement.

Examples: Do I look good in this dress?

This dish tastes delicious.

Examples: Theodore is smart.

Carlos and Jack seem angry.

Test Your Knowledge of Stative Verbs

Identify if the underlined verbs in the following sentences are stative verbs and linking verbs.

1. Peter was my best friend.

2. Dhanush does not feel good.

3. The new employer seems like a nice guy.

4. Do you think it is a good idea to go to London?

5. Jane seems to be an intelligent girl.

6. She has her own bike.

7. The ladies agreed with each other.

8. The movie on the real-time incident could be interesting.

9. Do you like the book I gave you?

10. I understand all of it now.

Check out your answers here.

1. Peter was my best friend. – Stative Verb

2. Dhanush does not feel good. – Stative Verb/Linking Verb

3. The new employer seems like a nice guy. – Stative Verb

4. Do you think it is a good idea to go to London? – Stative Verb

5. Jane seems to be an intelligent girl. – Stative Verb

6. She has her own bike. – Stative Verb

7. The ladies agreed with each other. – Stative Verb

8. The movie on the real-time incident could be interesting. – Linking Verb

9. Do you like the book I gave you? – Stative Verb

10. I understand all of it now. – Stative Verb

Frequently Asked Questions on Stative Verbs

What are stative verbs?

Stative verbs are verbs that are used to describe or indicate the state of being of a noun or pronoun that acts as the subject in a sentence.

What is the definition of a stative verb?

A stative verb is defined as “a verb that describes a state and not an action”, according to the Cambridge Dictionary. According to the Collins Dictionary, a stative verb is “a verb describing a state rather than an activity, act, or event, such as know and want as opposed to leave and throw.”

Give some examples of stative verbs.

All forms of ‘to be’ and verbs like feel, sense, taste, smell, look, have, has, want, know, etc., are some examples of stative verbs. Some verbs like feel, smell, taste, look, etc., act as both stative verbs and linking verbs.

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