Difference Between Simplex, Half Duplex, and Full Duplex Transmission Modes

Transmission Modes: Know What is the Difference Between Simplex, Half Duplex, and Full Duplex Transmission Modes

The transmission mode is the process of transferring data and information between two devices. Thus, it is often known as a communication mode. Some networks and buses allow the occurrence of communication between individual interconnected devices. The transmission modes are of three major types:

  • Simplex Transmission Mode
  • Half Duplex Transmission Mode
  • Full Duplex Transmission Mode

Let us discuss the difference between Simplex, Half Duplex, and Full-Duplex transmission methods. But let us know individually about them in detail.

What is Simplex Transmission Mode?

In this mode, we have unidirectional communication- meaning it’s a one-way street. Out of the two connecting devices, only one is capable of transmission- the other one is only capable of receiving. The simplex mode can always utilize a channel’s entire capacity for sending the data in a single direction.

For Example – Traditional monitors and keyboards use the Simplex transmission mode. In this case, the monitor can only generate the output, and the keyboard can only introduce an input in the system.

What is Half Duplex Transmission Mode?

In this mode, every station can both- receive and transmit data- but not at the very same moment. When one of the devices sends information, the other one can only then receive it. It also happens vice versa because the transmission is not unidirectional. The half-duplex mode comes into play in those cases where we don’t need the transmission in both directions at the same moment.

For Example – A walkie-talkie uses the Half-Duplex Transmission Mode. Here, we send messages in both directions, but the transmission still occurs in one direction at a time.

What is Full Duplex Transmission Mode?

In this mode, both the stations have the ability to both receive and transmit data simultaneously. The signals that go in one direction in a Full-Duplex mode share the link’s capacity with the signals that go in the other direction. Such kind of sharing can occur in two alternative ways:

  • The transmission link must have two transmission paths that are physically separate- one of them for receiving and the other one for sending.
  • The link can divide the capacity between the signals that travel in either of the directions.

The Full-Duplex communication mode comes into play when one requires a continuous connection in both directions all the time. However, it needs to divide the channel’s capacity between both these directions.

For Example – Telephone networks that establish communication between two people via a telephone line use the Full Duplex method. Here, the individuals can listen as well as talk at the very same time.

Difference Between Simplex, Half Duplex, and Full Duplex Transmission Modes

Parameters

Simplex Transmission Mode

Half Duplex Transmission Mode

Full Duplex Transmission Mode

Definition

It is a mode of transmission in which the flow of data is unidirectional. It means that the participant can do only one task at a time in a single direction. The receiver can only receive data and not send it (and vice versa).

It is a mode of transmission in which the flow of data is bi-directional but only in one direction at a time. It means that the receiver can receive as well as send data but can perform only one of these tasks at a time.

It is a mode of transmission in which the flow of data is bi-directional. But here, the devices can send as well as receive data simultaneously at the same time. It means that the receiver can receive as well as send data at the very same time with no hitch.

Flow of Data

As already mentioned above, the Simplex Mode supports a UniDirectional flow of data.

The Half-Duplex Mode supports a BiDirectional flow of data but in one direction at a time.

The Full-Duplex Mode supports a BiDirectional flow of data in both directions at the same time (simultaneous flow).

Sender and Receiver

The sender can only send data. But there’s no option to receive it (and vice versa). Thus, the transmission involves one station as a sender and the other one as a receiver.

A device can both send and receive data. But it cannot perform both the processes together- only one thing is possible at a time. This mode connects two systems by a point-to-point link for the transmission and receiving of signals.

Both the devices or end stations in the transmission can act as senders as well as receivers. The transmission also occurs simultaneously in both directions at the same time.

Capacity Usage

The transmission channel’s entire capacity goes into sending the data in just one direction. Thus, this transmission works well when we require the entire bandwidth for data transmission.

It conserves bandwidth and utilizes a single communication channel by sharing it alternatively between both directions. Thus, it works well in the cases where you send data in both directions, but alternatively.

It uses the entire communication channel by splitting it in a way that allows transmission in both directions at the same time. As a result, it works well when we need to communicate in both directions with no delays.

Utilization of Bandwidth

Simplex utilizes the maximum of a single bandwidth.

The Half Duplex involves lesser utilization of a single bandwidth at the time of transmission.

The Full-Duplex doubles the utilization of transmission bandwidth.

Performance

The Simplex Mode of transmission is the worst performing one. It is because it takes the longest time to transmit data.

The Half-Duplex Mode, on the other hand, exhibits better performance than the Simplex Mode. But its performance is lower as compared to the Full-Duplex Mode.

The Full-Duplex Mode performs the best among all. It is because the transmission is continual as well as bi-directional. So, there remains no barriers or delay in transmission, plus it doubles the bandwidth utilization.

Example

The keyboard, Television, Mouse, Radio Broadcasts, and Monitor are great examples of a Simplex transmission.

A Walkie-talkie set is an example of Half Duplex transmission.

Telephone lines, Mobile phones are commendable examples of Full-Duplex transmission.

Keep learning and stay tuned to get the latest updates on GATE Exam along with Eligibility Criteria, GATE Application Form, Syllabus, GATE Cut off, Previous Year Question Papers, and more.

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