Comprehensive News Analysis – 20 November 2016

Table of Contents:

A. GS1 Related:

1. Not clear if bull-taming practice evolved into jallikattu: Historian

B. GS2 Related:

1. WhatsApp governance works wonders for Bengaluru

2. India-U.S. clean energy cooperation will go on

3. Dalai Lama visits Mongolia despite China’s objections

4. Sri Lanka’s Tamil leaders reject Mittal’s ‘overpriced’ steel houses for the war-hit

C. GS3 Related:

1. What is Frankenfixation?

2. A silken touch to healing

D. GS4 Related
E. Important Editorials : A Quick Glance

The Hindu

1. Owning up to the onus

2. Healthy children build healthy nations

F. Concepts-in-News: Related Concepts to Revise/Learn:
G. BILLS/ACTS/SCHEMES/ORGS IN NEWS
H. Fun with Practice Questions 🙂
I. Archives

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Useful News Articles

A. GS1 Related
  1. Not clear if bull-taming practice evolved into jallikattu: Historian

Category: Art and Culture 

Topic: Art Forms

Key Points:

  • In Kotagiri, Tamil Nadu, rock paintings, dating back to the period between 3500 and 1500 BC, depict some sort of a bull-taming or bull-chasing exercise being carried out by the early settlers in the Nilgiris.
  • Art historian K.T. Gandhi Rajan, believes that it was this practice that transformed into the modern sport of jallikattu.
  • Art historian K.T. Gandhi Rajan asserts that neolithic stone axes were found in Karikkiyur, in Kotagiri and the people of the south, especially Tamil Nadu, have a historical, cultural link with bull-taming.
  • However, Dr. C. Maheswaran, an authority on archaeological findings and rock art in the Nilgiris, believes that although there was enough evidence of bull-taming in the form of rock art and other archaeological sources, it is unclear whether historical processes led to the practice later transforming into a sport.
  • It is important to note that the rock paintings dotted around the Nilgiris need to be protected for their intrinsic cultural value.

 

B. GS2 Related
  1. WhatsApp governance works wonders for Bengaluru

Category: Polity and Governance

Topic: E-Governance   

Key Points:

  • In Bangalore, residents’ associations have been using social media to bridge the gap between citizens and those who govern them.
  • Whatsapp has become a tool to cut through the red tape and drive change.
  • With this initiative, civic officials, traffic police and the local inspector are now just a text away.
  • Nowadays in Bangalore, almost every locality with an active Residents’ Welfare Association has multiple WhatsApp groups.
  • Members of these WhatsApp groups include officials from utility service providers such as the Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP), water and electricity utilities, and the police.

 

2. India-U.S. clean energy cooperation will go on

Category: International Relations

Topic: Effect of policies and politics of developed and developing countries on India’s interests

Key Points:

  • A high-ranking official in the Obama administration has assured that with the change in the United States administration, there wouldn’t be any impact on India-U.S. cooperation in the field of renewable energy.
  • Nisha Biswal, Assistant Secretary, South and Central Asian Affairs has maintained that “India- U.S. relations will have to move beyond government to government. India-U.S. relations are global, but it should also be local.”


  1. Dalai Lama visits Mongolia despite China’s objections

Category: International Relations

Topic: Effect of policies and politics of developed and developing countries on India’s interests

Key Points:

  • The Dalai Lama recently met with Buddhist worshippers during a four-day visit to Mongolia.
  • This visit goes against Beijing’s demands that he be barred from entering the country.
  • China has maintained that it remains “firmly opposed to the anti-China separatist activities by the Dalai Lama in any country, in any name, and in any capacity.”
  • China views the Dalai Lama as a devious separatist bent on breaking apart China.
  • It is important to note that Mongoliais home to devout Buddhists, and is heavily dependent on trade with China.

 

What the Dalai Lama wants?

The Dalai Lama has pressed for Tibetan autonomy rather than outright independence from China.


  1. Sri Lanka’s Tamil leaders reject Mittal’s ‘overpriced’ steel houses for the war-hit

Category: International Relations

Topic: Effect of policies and politics of developed and developing countries on India’s interests

Key Points:

  • Recently, Sri Lankan Tamil leaders have rejected a proposed ArcelorMittal housing project for the war-affected people in the North and East of the country.
  • Leaders of the Tamil National Alliance (TNA), which is a coalition of political parties representing Sri Lanka’s Northern Tamils — said they “strongly oppose” the project.
  • They have deemed its cost and design unsuitable for the region.
  • Arcelor Mittal, which is a global steel major, owned by billionaire Lakshmi Mittal, was to build 65,000 pre-fabricated houses for LKR 2.1 million each (approximately Rs. 9.7 lakh).

 

C. GS3 Related
  1. What is Frankenfixation?

Category: Science and Technology

Topic: Developments

Key Points:

  • ‘Frankenfixation’ refers to the use of genetic modification to fix carbon dioxide into the soil.
  • It derives from the term popularised by critics of genetically modified foods, ‘Frankenfoods’.

 

  1. A silken touch to healing

Category: Science and Technology

Topic: Developments

Key Points:

  • It is important to note that the silk industry in India has been reeling under the impact of cheap imports from China.
  • Recently, a Bengaluru-based company has developed a silk protein-derived product.
  • This silk protein-derived product can be used in place of traditional dressing for wounds.
  • The dressing is produced from cut cocoons after the silkworm has left the cocoon.
  • Thus, it is a cleaner alternative to collagen dressings, which are currently the only form of dressing other than skin grafts, which actively help in healing of wounds.

 

D. GS4 Related
E. Important Editorials: A Quick Glance
The Hindu
  1. Owning up to the onus

Category: Science and Technology, Economy 

Topic: Developments, Pharmaceutical Industry  

Key Points:

  • Recently, 13 pharmaceutical companies came up with a new road map, assigning to themselves four key commitments that they will deliver by 2020 to reduce antimicrobial resistance.
  • Some of the top names in drug production, including Pfizer, Merck, Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline and Allergan, and Indian drug makers such as Cipla and Wockhardt, have signed up to this scheme.
  • This development happens ahead of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) High-Level Meeting on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR).
  • This initiative reflects the companies’ intent to continue to proactively contribute to the global efforts to address AMR.

 

  1. Healthy children build healthy nations

Category: Polity and Governance 

Topic: Health, Govt. Initiatives   

Key Points:

There are some important facts to note- for example:

  1. Our country is home to the largest child population in the world.
  2. A substantial 41 per cent, around 450 million, are children.
  3. Unfortunately, for their education, health and protection, a paltry 4 per cent of the gross domestic product (GDP) is being spent.
  4. Among the general category of patients in public hospitals, about 70 per cent were once child labourers.
  5. Around health indicators: Only 65.3 per cent of the under-five children fully immunised. 80% of the children under three years of age are anaemic and every 3 out of 5 children are malnourished.

Thus, a great deal of political and social will is required to prioritise children in budgetary allocations.

Child labourers face the risk of manufacturers exploiting them as inexpensive labour.

It is important to note that the working children of today are virtually the liabilities of tomorrow.

Further, it is important to note that there is a strong link between pollution and children’s cognitive function. Early exposure to toxic air has lifelong consequences for them.

 

The Way Forward

  • It is important that the Ministry of Health forges stronger partnerships with the Ministry of Women and Child Development, Labour, Education, and other agents involved with children.
  • Creating a shared value of children’s health across the various sectors is critical
  • Private hospitals must be given the mandate to provide free health services to those in need.
  • It would be ideal that schools facilitate regular health check-ups, vaccination programmes and provide easy medical access to students.
  • IT should be used proactively to make progress in the medical field- they can be adapted to maintain a central repository of health records, etc.


F. Concepts-in-News: Related Concepts to Revise/Learn:
  • Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)
  • Frankenfixation



H. Fun with Practice Questions 🙂
Question 1: Consider the following statements,
  1. Recently, a Bengaluru-based company has developed a silk protein-derived product that can be used in place of traditional dressing for wounds.
  2. The dressing is produced from cut cocoons after the silkworm has left the cocoon and is a cleaner alternative to collagen dressings.

Which of the following statements is/are correct?

a) 1 Only

b) 2 Only

c) Both 1 and 2

d) Neither 1 nor 2


Question 2: Consider the following statements,
  1. ‘Frankenfixation’ refers to the use of genetic modification to fix carbon dioxide into the soil.
  2. It derives from the term popularised by critics of genetically modified foods, ‘Frankenfoods’.

Which of the following statements is/are correct?

a) 1 Only

b) 2 Only

c) Both 1 and 2

d) Neither 1 nor 2


Question 3: Consider the following statements,
  1. Mongolia is a landlocked country in Central Asia and East Asia, located between China and Russia.
  2. The Gobi desert is a cold desert.

Which of the following statements is/are correct?

a) 1 Only

b) 2 Only

c) Both 1 and 2

d) Neither 1 nor 2


Question 4: Shola forests are commonly found in
a) Vindhyas

b) Nilgiri

c) Lower Himalaya

d) Aravali


Question 5: What divide separates India from Sri Lanka?
a) Palk Strait

b) Malacca Strait

c) Hormuz strait

d) Nine Degree Channel


Check Your Answers

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