Difference between Vegetative Propagation and Spore Formation

Vegetative reproduction and spore formation are types of asexual reproduction in plants, algae and fungi. Asexual reproduction is a method of reproduction where only a single parent is involved to produce the offspring. Fusion of gametes does not take place. The offspring produced is genetically identical to the parent or is the β€œclone” of the parent.

Different methods of asexual reproduction are binary fission, budding, fragmentation, spore formation and vegetative propagation. Asexual reproduction is common in unicellular organisms, algae, fungi, plants and lower invertebrates.

Vegetative Propagation

Vegetative propagation is a type of asexual reproduction in plants. Here, a new individual is produced from the vegetative parts of a plant such as roots, stems and leaves. In plants, the unit of vegetative propagation is called vegetative propagules, e.g. rhizome, runner, sucker, tuber, leaf buds, offset, bulb, bulbils, etc.

Spore Formation

Spore formation is a method of asexual reproduction in algae, fungi and lower plants. Spores are produced asexually that give rise to offspring. In plants such as bryophytes, pteridophytes, etc. haploid spores are produced after meiosis that produce gametophytes. In algae and fungi, true asexual spores are produced by mitosis that germinates and produces new offspring. E.g. zoospores. These spores have thick walls and can withstand adverse conditions, under favourable conditions they germinate to produce new individuals. Spores may be motile with flagella or are dispersed through wind.

Difference between Vegetative Propagation and Spore Formation

The table below shows the main differences between Vegetative Propagation and Spore Formation.

Vegetative Propagation

Spore Formation

New plants are produced by the vegetative part of the plant

Spores are the reproductive structures that germinate into a new individual

It occurs in plants

It occurs in bacteria, algae, fungi and plants

It occurs through vegetative propagules

Spore formation takes place inside special reproductive structures called sporangia

Vegetative propagation occurs through non-motile structures

Spores may be flagellated and motile

These are comparatively less resistant to adverse conditions

Spores contain a hard protective covering, hence, they are more resistant to adverse conditions

Examples of vegetative propagules are rhizome, runner, sucker, tuber, leaf buds, offset, bulb, bulbils, etc

Examples are conidia, sporangiospores, zoospores, etc.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between spore formation and budding?

Spores are reproductive structures that are produced asexually by a parent and they germinate to give rise to a new individual. Budding is also a type of asexual reproduction, wherein a small bud-like structure grows on the parent cell. It grows and detaches to give rise to a new individual.

What is the difference between vegetative propagation and asexual reproduction?

Asexual reproduction is a type of reproduction where only one parent is involved. The offspring produced is identical to the parent morphologically and genetically. Vegetative propagation is a type of asexual reproduction, wherein a new plant is produced from the vegetative parts of a plant.

What is a vegetative propagation example?

Vegetative propagation is a type of asexual reproduction in plants. Examples of vegetative propagation are the eyes of a potato, the rhizome of ginger, leaf buds of Bryophyllum, offset of water hyacinth, bulbils of Agave, etc.

Explore all the important topics aligned with the updated NEET syllabus, only at BYJU’S. Check NEET – Important topics and Preparation Tips for all the important concepts and related topics.

Recommended Videos:

Vegetative Propagation

Spore formation

Further reading:

Leave a Comment

Your Mobile number and Email id will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*